The Lesson of Small Gifts

*This blog was written by Pastor Robert Parrish, Chaplain of Love Wins Community Engagement Center.  

As pastor, or chaplain, of Love Wins Community Engagement Center, I often give out Bibles to those who request them.  Like many people, homeless people see the need for spiritual nourishment in their lives. 

On one such occasion, a person named G asked me if she could have a Bible.  I gladly got her one.  Upon opening its pages, she stated that the print seemed a little small, but that she might be able to read it in brighter light.  Upon hearing this, I mentioned that I just might have a magnifying glass that she could have.  As a person who is legally blind, I seem to have several magnifiers laying around, and do not find it hard to spare one from time to time.  G was happy to hear that I might be giving her this gift.  Indeed, I did find a magnifier that I thought would be just right for her.  It has level two power and has an (led) light in it.

 When she arrived back a Love Wins a couple of weeks later, I gave her the magnifier.  Now, even though I could not clearly see her face, I could feel the beams of happiness and gratefulness coming from her.  As she tested its visual capability, G found that the magnifier was perfect for her. 

No, I did not give her a million dollars.  Yet, some how, I feel like I gave her something more.  Who knows how being able to read the Bible more easily might make a difference on how G will be guided in her life.  Can one really say how the wisdom that she might gain from reading the Bible might help her guide some one else?  

Gratefulness in receiving things that most might consider as small or even trivial, is something I see from the people at this engagement center.  Items like a canvas bag or a shirt or blouse are received as gold.  What this seems to say is that nothing is taken for granted.  Gifts or blessings, no matter how great or small, are really appreciated.  Although the clients of Love Wins Community Engagement Center don’t have a lot, they  teach the lessons of appreciation and gratefulness. 

In general, our American society is bombarded with the false notion that you’ve got to have this material thing, or that material thing.  Some how, if an item is more than a year old it is “out of style”.  Also, there is this thought that says “you are entitled to the very best”.  Thank God, or if you prefer, the Universe, that many homeless people teach the lesson of being satisfied with simple things. These marginalized people teach us the value of making items last as long as they can.   They teach us the lesson of being thankful and grateful, even for the small gift of a simple magnifier.